Our Blog Your Most Valued Customer

Jul 03, 2016

Your Most Valued Customer

Your most valued customer is not the one who’s a raving fan of your products and services. Believe it or not, your MVP is your most challenging customer! Hold on to your hats, this is going to be a good one. See, although every business owner strives to achieve satisfied customers, it’s actually the ones that are unhappy in some way that allows you to scrutinize your process and improve upon it. Below we will explore a few ways on how to turn those negative comments into positives.

As people want, need and desire different things, satisfying them all is hard to do. When you have succeeded at pleasing a customer, they tend to show it by passing on the word. Perhaps they will talk about how great your products are. This can generate new leads for your business and possibly turn into a sales-score! But what about those that aren’t as convinced? They may be a bit more delicate to deal with, but can also be a great learning source.

Through thorough customer analysis, you can turn those challenging customers into allies. Here’s a few snazzy ways you can do it:

  1.  Ask the right questions: What were they most unhappy with? What could you have done better? What would you like to see in the future? How can you make it better right now?
  2.  Assess your business: What are you missing? What are your current strategies and processes? How can you improve them? How is your staff performing?
  3.  Accept criticism with grace: Greet and thank your customer for their insight. Every bit of information you collect counts.
  4.  Do not take complaints personally: Be genuinely interested in solving their problem and how you can make their experience better. They want their needs met, so meet them.
  5.  Never show fear: Don’t get flustered or emotionally wound up. Be confident, kind in words and patient

By analyzing the data you receive from these customers, the power is now in your hands. Use negative feedback as a motivation to progress. The next time your MVP visits, they should see that their words were not said in vain. Give them something good to talk about.

What have you learned from your Most Valued Customer?